With cannabidiol (CBD) in the media as much as it is these days, you may be asking; Why should I use CBD oil?

There are many benefits to taking CBD products, but the most exciting among them is that a CBD oil supplement helps augment the body’s naturally occurring endocannabinoids, increasing the body’s ability to promote homeostasis within its systems.

Cannabinoids are a class of active chemical compounds produced by the cannabis plant. These cannabinoids act on cannabinoid receptors located in our cells as part of the endocannabinoid system and alter the release of neurotransmitters in the brain. The endocannabinoid system predominantly consists of two endocannabinoid receptors: CB1, located in the central nervous system, and CB2, found throughout the peripheral nervous system.

There are over 100 presently discovered cannabinoids, which are largely responsible for the effects cannabis has on the body. Common cannabinoids include tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), and cannabigerol (CBG). Cannabinoids work together with the body’s endocannabinoid system to regulate the body’s natural functions – including mood, sleep, appetite, and immune response.

Once the endocannabinoid system is supplemented in this way, it is able to function more efficiently, optimizing the body’s performance each day. Although it is not critical to supplement the endocannabinoid system daily, doing so may increase the effectiveness of CBD and the endocannabinoid system.

Because CBD oil products are categorized as supplements, we comply with the FDA’s DSHEA guidelines and cannot endorse any specific medical benefits of CBD or hemp oil. To further comply with FDA regulations, CBDedication.com does not list any Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) of our own, nor do we provide a Daily Value (%DV) for any of the products we sell. We encourage you to browse the thousands of reputable studies regarding CBD published online and talk with your doctor to see if a CBD supplement is right for you.

Note: Because each individual is unique, it’s  important to do research and speak with a physician or doctor regarding health-related questions or concerns that are specific to patient history. Although CBD hemp oil is beneficial to health, CBDedication.com does not make any medical claims based on the products we sell and should not be used with the intention of curing, or improving an illness.

A few short weeks ago, HempMeds® Mexico President Raul Elizalde addressed the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO) about CBD.

The Thirty-Ninth meeting of the Expert Committee on Drug Dependence was a five-day event in November 2017. The meeting took place for the ECDD to explore changes to the international scheduling of 16 different substances, including cannabidiol (CBD).

 

HISTORIC DAY FOR HEMPMEDS® AND CBD

The day was monumental for CBD, as the decision by the special committee could significantly influence CBD’s legality around the world and potentially impact the health options of millions.

At an open session on November 6, 2017, Raul spoke before the international officials about CBD’s benefits and its lack of psychoactivity. He urged the special committee to lift CBD’s internationally regulated status by considering it non-psychoactive and classifying it a nutritional supplement.

During his presentation to the committee at the U.N., Raul spread CBD awareness by sharing the story of his daughter Grace, Raul and his family were the first to sue the Mexican government for the right to import CBD oil into Mexico. He also shared the experiences of other families with CBD, and presented the results of recent studies on children using CBD products in Mexico.

 

RAUL’S ROAD

Raul’s story and journey to Geneva drew quite a bit of attention. Here is a collection of some of media articles and write-ups about Raul’s history-making journey.

HighTimes online’s A.J. Harrington wrote an article about HempMeds and Raul’s reasons for being a CBD champion. “He (Raul) was instrumental in the legalization of medical cannabis in Mexico, and his company (HempMeds®) produces the only cannabis medicine currently allowed by the Mexican government.”  https://hightimes.com/news/united-nations-decide-fate-cbd/

The MMJ Observer’s Steven Russel wrote this blog on Monday, November 6th, where he notes that “Dr. Stuart Titus, the CEO of HempMeds®, expressed that they are excited and honored to speak to United Nations leaders on an international stage about Cannabidiol as a supplement intended to maintain and enhance the well-being of millions.” https://www.mmjobserver.com/medical-marijuana-inc-otcmktsmjna-hempmeds-gets-attention-of-united-nations/29078/

The Latin American Heritage Tribune contributed this piece, that perfectly sums up Raul’s reasons for becoming a voice for CBD: “The father of a girl with severe epilepsy whose case paved the way for the legalization of medical marijuana in Mexico will appear before the World Health Organization on Monday to defend the use of a cannabis-derived compound as a treatment for seizures.”   http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=2445772&CategoryId=14091

 

Cannabinoids are a group of active compounds found in marijuana.

Marijuana contains many chemical compounds that create the different characteristics of the plant. Terpenes provide flavors and aromas, while chlorophyll in the leaves makes the plant green. But the most important chemicals in marijuana are the cannabinoids.

Cannabinoids are the chemicals which give the cannabis plant its medical and recreational properties. Cannabinoids like THC and CBD interact with different receptors in the body to produce a wide range of effects, such as feeling high.

But what exactly are cannabinoids, and why are they able to interact with the body? The answer has to do with cannabinoid receptors in the endocannabinoid system.

Let’s take a deeper look at these fascinating compounds.

Cannabinoids in Marijuana

The marijuana plant produces as many as 113 different cannabinoids. Among these cannabinoids, THC and CBD are the most prevalent and the most well-understood.

Marijuana’s cannabinoids are produced and stored within the trichomes (crystals) of the plant. These trichomes give marijuana flowers their shiny and sparkly appearance.

Most strains of marijuana sold today are cultivated with higher levels of THC. THC is known for its psychoactive properties, and is the reason you feel “high” after ingesting marijuana.

CBD is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid and actually works to counteract the high. CBD also has numerous benefits, such as anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties.

While THC and CBD are the most well-known cannabinoids, there are many other cannabinoids in marijuana that offer health benefits. Some of these include cannabigerol (CBG), cannabinol (CBN), and cannabichromene (CBC).

Endocannabinoids

Endocannabinoids are cannabinoids that are produced naturally by the human body. “Endo” stands for endogenous, which means originating within the body.

While these cannabinoids are distinct from those produced in marijuana, they share many similar properties and effects. This is because they interact with the same pathways in the brain and body called cannabinoid receptors.

Scientists believe there are many different endocannabinoids, but the most studied and understood are 2-AG and anandamide.

Other endocannabinoids include noladin ether, virodhamine, and N-arachidonyl dopamine (NADA).

While the functions of these cannabinoids within the body are wide-ranging, it is believed that their primary function is to promote homeostasis.

How Do Cannabinoids Work?

In order to understand cannabinoids, you have to know a bit about the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is a system in the human body consisting of cannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors.

These receptors and cannabinoids can be thought of as a lock-and-key system. Cannabinoids bind to cannabinoid receptors like a key fits into a lock. Unlocking the receptor causes changes in how cells function, leading to different effects in the body.

When marijuana enters your body, THC activates the endocannabinoid system by attaching to cannabinoid receptors.

There are two different types of cannabinoid receptors: CB1 and CB2. CB1 receptors are found primarily in the brain, and are responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana.

On the other hand, CB2 receptors are found mostly in other parts of the body. They are responsible for a wide range of biological functions.

The functions of the endocannabinoid system help explain the effects of marijuana. The endocannabinoid system is involved with regulating appetite, sleep, pain, mood, memory, and much more.